Masayuki Nagare

Biography

Masayuki Nagare has used the technique of “warehada” since early 1950s.It means that the work is unfinished by leaving the part where the stone is broken.
“The uncreated things sometimes surpass the created ones, and the uncreated ones make the most of the created things.”This expression is an unique aesthetic of his style, and later had a great impact on the United States.

In the 1960s, he had a great success in the United States and was recognized as an international sculptor.In 1963, he brought 600 tons of stone from Japan to the Japan Pavilion at the World Expo in New York and created a huge sculpture called “Stone Crazy”.In addition, he created a giant stone sculpture “Cloud Fortress” at the New York World Trade Center. (The “Cloud Fortress” was left unbroken during the terrorist attacks on September 11, but was dismantled as it hindered rescue operations.)

In the 1960s, Mrs. Rockefeller III purchased “Receiving” and it became a permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art, MOMA, New York.
Many of his works are made of heavy stones, but they have been designed to make them look lighter, such as a shape that makes them appear to float unexpectedly.
Each of his works have unique names that are related to his locals, and sculptures by Masayuki Nagare are widely known for their dignity in all parts of Japan and around the world.

Masayuki Nagare has used the technique of “warehada” since early 1950s.It means that the work is unfinished by leaving the part where the stone is broken.
“The uncreated things sometimes surpass the created ones, and the uncreated ones make the most of the created things.”This expression is an unique aesthetic of his style, and later had a great impact on the United States.

In the 1960s, he had a great success in the United States and was recognized as an international sculptor.In 1963, he brought 600 tons of stone from Japan to the Japan Pavilion at the World Expo in New York and created a huge sculpture called “Stone Crazy”.In addition, he created a giant stone sculpture “Cloud Fortress” at the New York World Trade Center. (The “Cloud Fortress” was left unbroken during the terrorist attacks on September 11, but was dismantled as it hindered rescue operations.)

In the 1960s, Mrs. Rockefeller III purchased “Receiving” and it became a permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art, MOMA, New York.
Many of his works are made of heavy stones, but they have been designed to make them look lighter, such as a shape that makes them appear to float unexpectedly.
Each of his works have unique names that are related to his locals, and sculptures by Masayuki Nagare are widely known for their dignity in all parts of Japan and around the world.

History

1923      born in Nagasaki, Japan

1943-45      Enrolled in the naval flying department in the old navy,
                   studied about piloting and baceme a pilot of a Zero fighter.

1955      First exhibition (Tokyo)

              selected for the Asahi Modern Art Fair vol.2 with Shigeru Ueki

1960      Tokyo Metropolitan Festival Hall, Tokyo, Japan

              San Diego Museum of Art, California, US
              selected for the permanent collections of MoMA

1962      Architectural Institute of Japan Prize

1963      “Stone Crazy” at New York World’s Fair, US

1967      Person of Cultural Merit in Kagawa Prefecture

1974      Japan Arts Grand Prix Award

              Nagano Open-Air Sclputure Prize

1975      Cloud Fortres at the World Trade Center, NewYork, US

              “Antwerp International Open-Air Sculpture Exhibition” 
              Middelheim Open-Air Museum for Modern Sculpture, Belgium

1978      Nakahara Teiji Prize vol.9

1983      Yoshida Isoya Prize

1987      “My Memories” (Nikkei)

1989      created “Hamaritsurin park” at Seto Ohashi Commemorative Park, Kagawa, Japan

1994      Nagano Open-Air Sclputure Prize

1995      “The world of Masayuki Nagare” (The Asahi Shimbun Company)

2002      created the Forest of the Stone Crazy, Hokkaido, Japan

2004      “Cloud Fortress Jr.” at Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Hokkaido, Japan 
              Originally, “Cloud Fortress” was once removed due to rescue operation on 9.11 in NY

2009      Shikoku Shimbun Cultural Award

              There are many more public works in the world.

1923      born in Nagasaki, Japan

1943-45      Enrolled in the naval flying
                   department in the old navy,
                   studied about piloting and
                   baceme a pilot of a Zero fighter.

1955      First exhibition (Tokyo)

              selected for the Asahi Modern Art
              Fair vol.2 with Shigeru Ueki

1960      Tokyo Metropolitan Festival Hall,
              Tokyo, Japan

              San Diego Museum of Art,
              California, US
              selected for the permanent
              collections of MoMA

1962      Architectural Institute of Japan
              Prize

1963      “Stone Crazy” at New York World’s
              Fair, US

1967      Person of Cultural Merit in Kagawa
              Prefecture

1974      Japan Arts Grand Prix Award

              Nagano Open-Air Sclputure Prize

1975      Cloud Fortres at the World Trade
              Center, NewYork, US

              “Antwerp International Open-Air
              Sculpture Exhibition”  Middelheim
              Open-Air Museum for Modern
              Sculpture, Belgium

1978      Nakahara Teiji Prize vol.9

1983      Yoshida Isoya Prize

1987      “My Memories” (Nikkei)

1989      created “Hamaritsurin park” at
              Seto Ohashi Commemorative Park,
              Kagawa, Japan

1994      Nagano Open-Air Sclputure Prize

1995      “The world of Masayuki Nagare”
              (The Asahi Shimbun Company)

2002      created the Forest of the Stone
              Crazy, Hokkaido, Japan

2004      “Cloud Fortress Jr.” at Hokkaido
              Museum of Modern Art,
              Hokkaido, Japan 
              Originally, “Cloud Fortress” was once
              removed due to rescue operation on
              9.11 in NY

2009      Shikoku Shimbun Cultural Award

              There are many more public works
              in the world.

Available Works